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Apr 29, 2011

how to say "to snore" in Hebrew...




The daily aspect of קצת עברית - Ktzat Ivrit - has been spotty over the past few days. I finally arrived this morning at 5:45 in Ben Gurion Airport near Tel Aviv after having flown from LAX on Wednesday afternoon and having had a great time during my nine-hour stopover in Madrid (based upon which I'll introduce a word once I have the pictures from my new friends/co-travelers).


I didn't sleep much during my transit, due partly to decongestant medication I'm taking, but also due to the guy snoring next to me...




To snore in Hebrew is לִנְחוֹר (leen-KHOHR). הוּא נָחַר כָּל הַלָּיְלָה (hoo nah-KHAHR kohl hah-LAH-ee-lah) is he was snoring all night.


לנחור is an "active simple" פעל (pah-AHL) verb.


שבת שלום וסוף שבוע נעים לכולם!
Shabbat Shalom and a nice weekend to all!


Apr 27, 2011

how to say "to exaggerate" and "over the top" in Hebrew...


לְהַגְזִים, מֻגְזָם


Tonight's my last night in LA before I board a flight to TLV via Madrid (9 hour stopover! Viva Madrid!). 


My dear mom just requested this dose, which I faintly recall having done a while ago... but a refresher ain't a bad idea once in a while. Plus, I'm sure I'll include some info I didn't include the first time around.


To exaggerate, literally, is לְהַגְזִים (leh-hahg-ZEEM). But the word isn't reserved only for the literal sense. You can say that a person is overdoing something using the same word - הִיא מַגְזִימָה עִם כָּל הַמַּתָּנוֹת (hee mahg-zee-MAH eem kohl hah-mah-tah-NOHT) - She's overdoing it with all the gifts.


להגזים is a verb that falls into the "active-causative" הפעיל (heef-EEL) pattern.


Similarly, you could say that something is overdone using the "passive-causative" form, the הופעל (hoof-AHL): לְהִשָּׁאֵר עֵר כָּל הַלָּיְלָה זֶה מֻגְזָם (leh-hee-shah-EHR ehr kohl hah-LAH-ee-lah zeh moog-ZAHM) - To stay up all night is over the top


בְּעֶצֶם, זֶה תָּלוּי בַּנְּסִבּוֹת (beh-EH-tsem, zeh tah-LOO-ee bah-neh-see-BOHT) - Actually, that depends on the circumstances.






We've still got a few spots......
in our state-of-the-art conversational Hebrew courses
in JerusalemEfrat and Raanana.

Apr 26, 2011

how to say "to encourage" in Hebrew...



This Sunday, our classes begin afresh in Jerusalem, Efrat and Raanana (Tel Aviv coming very soon!). Our classes are small - and we've got a few spots left in all of them. 


a Raanana class at work/play




אֲנִי מְעוֹדֵד אֶתְכֶם (ah-NEE meh-oh-DED et-KHEM) - I encourage you (plural) to find out more by visiting our calendar page.


To encourage is לְעוֹדֵד (leh-oh-DED). It loosely fits into the פיעל (pee-EL) "active-intensive" form.


Encouragement is עִדוּד (ee-DOOD) or חִזּוּק (khee-ZOOK), coming from the word for strong - חָזָק (khah-ZAHK).


Apr 24, 2011

how to say "conflict of interest" in Hebrew...


נִגּוּד אִינְטֶרֶסִים




We've still got a few spots......
in our state-of-the-art conversational Hebrew courses
in JerusalemEfrat and Raanana
 
I'm right now in LA - hometown of the movie industry, as well as the setting of the film, The Lincoln Lawyer, which I just watched with my buddies Daniel and Gabe at the Sherman Oaks Galleria.






I enjoy hotshot lawyer films like these, along with other mystery/thrillers such as Primal Fear and The Sixth Sense (Lincoln Lawyer was fun, but the latter two are much better).


A key element in the plot of The Lincoln Lawyer is the main character's conflicting commitments to several opposing parties - a conflict of interest. In Hebrew, we call this נִגּוּד אִינְטֶרֶסִים (nee-GOOD een-teh-REH-seem).


The first word, ניגוד, comes from the preposition נֶגֶד (NEH-gehd), meaning against or opposite. Another Hebrew word formed by the root נ.ג.ד (n.g.d) is לְהִתְנַגֵּד (leh-heet-nah-GEHD) - to be opposed (to something).


The second word in the phrase comes from a Latinate language, most likely Spanish.






Some of the Israelites at the Red Sea - still with a slave mentality - may have experienced ניגוד אינטרסים when they were charged to cross the parted waters. Jews around the world commemorating this event tomorrow, however, likely no longer feel it.


חג שמח!
Happy holidays!


Apr 22, 2011

how to say "to fall asleep" in Hebrew...







We've still got a few spots......
in our state-of-the-art conversational Hebrew courses
in JerusalemEfrat and Raanana.


When I was in eleventh grade I perfected the art of falling asleep in class without the teacher noticing: I would lean my head into my palm, which was supported by my elbow placed on the desk.


This guy won't fool the teacher.


To sleep, in Hebrew, is לִישׁוֹן (lee-SHOHN). But to fall asleep is לְהֵרָדֵם (leh-heh-rah-DEM). For instance, אָסוּר להירדם בְּאֶמְצַע אֲכִילַת מַצָּה (ah-SOOR leh-heh-rah-DEM beh-EM-tsah ah-khee-LAHT mah-TSAH) - Don't (literally, it's forbidden to) fall asleep in the middle of eating Matzo.


להרדם falls into the נפעל (neef-AHL) pattern.


שבת שלום, סוף שבוע נעים וחג שמח לכולם!
Shabbat Shalom, have a pleasant weekend and happy holidays to everyone!

Apr 21, 2011

what your computer mouse is called in Hebrew...


THANK YOU to those who have already helped! 


If you know the word for mouse the mammal, you know the word for the electronic one you've probably got your hand on right now: עַכְבָּר (ahkh-BAHR). 


Scary? Nuisance? Cute?
חג פסח שמח!Happy Passover!




We've still got a few spots......
in our state-of-the-art conversational Hebrew courses
in JerusalemEfrat and Raanana.

Apr 18, 2011

how to say "to make the most of something" in Hebrew...


THANK YOU to those who have already helped! 


The Hebrew word for juice - that which is squeezed out of a fruit - is מִיץ (meets).






To squeeze something out so as to get the most out of it - such as life or a topic of discussion - is לְמַצּוֹת (leh-mah-TSOHT). It's an "intensive" פיעל (pee-EL) verb.


For example, הִיא מִצְּתָה אֶת כָּל הָאֶפְשָׁרֻיּוֹת (hee meets-eh-TAH et KOHL hah-ef-shah-roo-YOHT) - She exhausted all her (literally, the) options.





למצות sounds like מַצָּה (mah-TSAH) - Matzo, eh? I don't think there's a relationship. However, at least one rabbinical/liguistic authority believes there's a connection between the מצה that we eat and another Biblical homonym, מצה, meaning a fight



But why fight? It's פֶּסַח (PEH-sahkh) - Passover! Let's make the most of it!


חַג שָׂמֵח (khahg sah-MEH-ahkh)!
Happy holiday!



We've still got a few spots......
in our state-of-the-art conversational Hebrew courses
in JerusalemEfrat and Raanana.