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Dec 31, 2010

how to say "warmth" in Hebrew...


For many of us, it's cold these days. The heaters and the duvets are out, for some of us the snowplows and the food rations... 

Not everyone likes the heat, but I think it's safe to say that everyone likes warmth, both in the physical sense of sitting by a cozy fire, and in the emotional sense.



The Hebrew word for both heat and warmth is חוֹם (khohm). But there's another word that refers to just warmth: חֲמִימוּת (khah-mee-MOOT).

Wishing you all a 
שבת שלום וסוף שבוע חָמִים... ושנה טובה Shabbat Shalom, a warm weekend (sohf shah-VOO-ah khah-MEEM)... and happy new year,

Ami






Ulpan La-Inyan courses...

...are starting up again on January 9!

We'll get you talking... in Hebrew. Check us out.


Dec 30, 2010

how to say "decade" in Hebrew...


*** Correction - Yesterday I wrote that מְתֻחְכָּם (me-tookh-KAHM) - sophisticated - is a הופעל (hoof-AHL) verb. That was an error - it's a פועל (poo-AHL) verb. *** 

Today's word...

If you can count to ten in Hebrew, you know the word עֶשֶׂר (EH-sehr) - ten. If you're grammar-savvy in Hebrew, you know עֲשָׂרָה (ah-sah-RAH) as well - also ten, but referring to ten things that are grammatically masculine, such as עֲשָׂרָה גְּמָלִים (ah-sah-RAH ghe-mah-LEEM) - ten camels.

The word for decade is עָשׂוֹר. For example, This is the word of the decade - זֹאת מִלַּת הֶעָשוֹר (zoht mee-LAHT heh-ah-SOHR).

But we've got one more day before the new עשור... so stay tuned for another word tomorrow.





Ulpan La-Inyan courses...

...are starting up again on January 9!

We'll get you talking... in Hebrew. Check us out.



Dec 29, 2010

how to say "capable" in Hebrew...


The other day I introduced the word מְתֻחְכָּם (me-tookh-KAHM) - sophisticated and mistakenly wrote that it comes from the verb form, פיעל (pee-EHL). The truth is, it's from פועל (hoof-AHL). So if you want to learn how to use פועל, check this page out.

Today's word also comes from פועל (poo-AHL), the passive counterpart to פיעל (pee-EHL).

But enough about grammar.

Suppose you're with a friend at the British Museum, and your friend doesn't know how to read the hieroglyphics on the Rosetta Stone. You might say about yourself, I can! or I'm capable! 

Here's how to say it in Hebrew, if you're a male: אֲנִי מְסֻגָּל (ah-NEE me-soo-GAHL)... and if you're a female: אֲנִי מְסֻגֶּלֶת (ah-NEE me-soo-GHEH-let).



Missed our registration deadline? Get the pre-deadline price anyway!

Sunday was the last day to sign up for our courses at the pre-deadline prices.





Today (Wednesday), however, I'm giving away admission to our courses at pre-deadline prices

How can you get this deal? Tune in to my Israeli music hour on RustyMike Radio, today from 12pm-1pm Israel time, and listen for instructions.

See you then...



Dec 28, 2010

how to say "character trait" or "product feature" in Hebrew...


I think it's reasonable to assume that nearly everyone on the planet - if not everyone - has admirable as well as less-than-admirable character traits.

The word תְּכוּנָה (te-khoo-NAH) can refer to such traits, as well as non-human traits or features. For example, לַגִּרְסָה הַחֲדָשָׁה שֶׁל "חֲלוֹנוֹת" יֵשׁ תְּכוּנוֹת חֲדָשׁוֹת (la-gheer-SAH hah-khah-dah-SHAH shel "khah-loh-NOHT" yesh te-khoo-NOHT khah-dah-SHOHT) - The new version of Windows has new features.



Missed our registration deadline? Get the pre-deadline price anyway!

Sunday was the last day to sign up for our courses at the pre-deadline prices.




This Wednesday (tomorrow), however, I'm giving away admission to our courses at pre-deadline prices

How can you get this deal? Tune in to my Israeli music hour onRustyMike Radio, Wednesday from 12pm-1pm Israel time, and listen for instructions.

See you then...




Dec 27, 2010

how to say "discounted price" in Hebrew...


If you've shopped in Israel or have taken our Level 1 class, you certainly know the word for inexpensive - זוֹל (transliterations here).

To say that a price has been reduced, or made more inexpensive, you'd say, הַמְּחִיר הוּזָל. You can also say, הַמְּחִיר הֻפְחַת - the price has been lessened, where הופחת is related to the word for less, פָּחוֹת. 

Both הוזל and הופחת are past-tense usages - that the price has been reduced. And both words are in the הופעל verb form, which you can learn how to use here.

To say that a price is lower or is less expensive, you'd call the price מוזל or מופחת. These are the present-tense conjugations of the הופעל, but they're also adjectives. 

For example...

Ulpan La-Inyan courses בִּמְחִיר מוּזָל

Yesterday was the last day to sign up for our courses at the pre-deadline prices.



This Wednesday, however, I'm giving away admission to our courses במחיר מוזל - at a discounted price

How can you get this deal? By tuning in to my Israeli music hour on RustyMike Radio, Wednesday from 12pm-1pm Israel time.

See you then...





Dec 26, 2010

how to say "sophisticated" in Hebrew...


If you know some Hebrew, you surely know the word for wise or smart - חָכָם/חֲכָמָה.

But sophisticated is more than smart. It takes smart to a whole different level. Thus Hebrew takes the root ח.כ.מ (kh.k.m) and adds a ת (t) to the beginning, taking the meaning of words derived to a whole new level.

You might say, הוּא אָדָם מְתֻחְכָּם - he is a sophisticated person. (I've omitted transliteration - if you need it, please go here.)

מתוחכם is an adjective derived from the פֻּעַל verb form. You can learn how to use this verb form by visiting our פועל page.


Registration deadline today!

Today is the final day to register for the upcoming Ulpan La-Inyan session and save NIS 200. Classes will be taking place in Jerusalem, in Raanana and online.

What are you waiting for?!


Dec 24, 2010

how to say "starting to pick up speed" in Hebrew...


Acceleration is a physics concept that has been used to describe trends in business, social media etc. The Hebrew word is תְּאוּצָה (te-oo-TSAH), a noun form of לְהָאִיץ (le-hah-EETS), to accelerate - a הפעיל (heef-EEL) verb.

Say a product or an idea is catching on, starting to pick up speed. In Hebrew, we'd say, הָרַעֲיוֹן מַתְחִיל לִתְפּוֹס תְּאוּצָה (hah-rah-ah-YOHN maht-KHEEL leet-POHS te-oo-TSAH) - The idea is starting to catch acceleration.



Registration for our classes מתחיל לתפוס תאוצה...

This Sunday is the deadline for early registration, to save NIS 200 on your course starting January 9. Our courses are offered in JerusalemRaanana and online.

See you in class.

And in the meantime, שבת שלום וסוף שבוע נעים - Shabbat Shalom, and good weekend, and happy holidays for those celebrating this weekend.

Ami and the Team

Dec 23, 2010

how to say "diligence" and "persistence" in Hebrew...


At the front of a synagogue, usually hanging over the ark, shines a light that stays on on a regular basis. This light is called the נֵר תָּמִיד (nehr tah-MEED), the "always" candle.

Diligence and persistence are about doing something regularly. It's the best way to get something done that takes a long time, such as getting an education or learning a language.

The Hebrew word for diligence or persistence is הַתְמָדָה (haht-mah-DAH). You can use it as a verb (in the הפעיל - heef-EEL form) by saying, צָרִיךְ לְהַתְמִיד כְּדֵי לִלְמוֹד שָׂפָה חֲדָשָׁה (tsah-REEKH le-haht-MEED ke-DAY leel-MOHD sah-FAH khah-dah-SHAH) - (one) must act persistently in order to learn a new language.


How you can learn to speak Hebrew, with comfortable persistence:

At Ulpan La-Inyan, we believe in learning Hebrew incrementally - that practice makes perfect, and התדמה delivers real results.
This Sunday is the deadline for early registration, to save NIS 200 on your course starting January 9. Our courses are offered in Jerusalem, Raanana and online.

See you in class!
Ami and the team

Dec 22, 2010

how to "verify" in Hebrew....


If you know some Hebrew, you likely know the word for truth - אֶמֶת (eh-MET).

Suppose a woman representing your credit card company calls to inform you that you and your family have won a trip to Euro Disney. She'd ask you to verify your details. This is how she might say it: 

אֲנִי רַק צְרִיכָה לְאַמֵּת אֶת הַפְּרָטִים שֶׁלָּכֶם (ah-NEE rahk roh-TSAH le-ah-MET et hah-prah-TEEM sheh-lah-KHEM) - I just need to verify your details.

לְאַמֵּת - to verify. It falls under the פִּעֵל (pee-EL) verb form. You can learn how to conjugate this verb by visiting the פיעל page on ulpan.com.


10 percent off an Ulpan La-Inyan course...

Today I'm giving away 10% off of an Ulpan La-Inyan course for the upcoming session, in Jerusalem, Raanana or online.

How can you get it?

Tune in to my radio show between noon and 1pm Israel time today on RustyMike Radio, and listen for instructions.


Dec 21, 2010

how to say "an effort" in Hebrew...


The Hebrew word for courage and valor is אֹמֶץ (OH-mets). The word for an effort or exertion, or an act of valor is מַאֲמָץ (mah-ah-MAHTS). For example, אֲנִי עוֹשֶׂה מַאֲמָץ לֶאֱכוֹל בָּרִיא (ah-NEE oh-SEH mah-ah-MAHTS le-eh-KHOHL bah-REE) - I make an effort to eat healthy.

To make an effort, often a physical one, is לְהִתְאַמֵּץ (le-heet-ah-METS). A synonym is לְהִשְׁתַּדֵּל (le-heesh-tah-DEHL) - this is to make an effort requiring dedication. 



Want Hebrew? 
Course registration deadline coming up!

This Sunday is the last day to receive discounted admission to an Ulpan La-Inyan course this January, so make sure you get in!

Our courses are offered both online as well as in person, in Jerusalem and Raanana.



Dec 20, 2010

how to say "to avoid" in Hebrew...


To prevent something actively, in Hebrew, is לִמְנוֹע (leem-NOH-ah). For example, צָרִיך לַעֲבוֹד כְּדֵי לִמְנוֹעַ אָסוֹן (tsah-REEKH la-ah-VOHD ke-DEH-ee leem-NOH-ah ah-SOHN) - we need to work to prevent a disaster. למנוע is an active, "simple" verb, a פעל (pah-AHL) verb.

To avoid something is to prevent it from happening indirectly. For example, הִיא נִמְנַעַת מִלְּעַשֵּׁן (hee neem-NAH-aht mee-le-ah-SHEN) - she avoids smoking. And by avoiding smoking, she prevents smoking from occurring... at least by her. 

The Hebrew word for to avoid is לְהִמָּנַע (le-hee-mah-NAH), and is always followed by מ - (m) - from, as in the example above. להמנע is also a "simple" verb, but not an active one; it's a נפעל (neef-AHL) verb.

To figure out how to use this word in all different contexts and conjugations, please visit the נפעל page on ulpan.com.



Want Hebrew? 
Course registration deadline coming up!

This Sunday is the last day to receive discounted admission to an Ulpan La-Inyan course this January, so make sure you get in!

Our courses are offered both online as well as in person, in Jerusalem and Raanana.



Dec 19, 2010

how to say "to locate" something or someone, in Hebrew...


If you've been following קצת עברית (Ktzat Ivrit) for a while, you likely know the word for site - אֲתָר (ah-TAHR). The word is borrowed from Aramaic, creating a synonym for מָקוֹם (mah-KOHM) - place. To refer to a website in Hebrew, you'd say אֲתָר אִינְטֶרְנֶט (ah-TAHR EEN-tehr-net).

To locate something or someone is לְאַתֵּר (le-ah-TEHR). For example, אִתַּרְנוּ אֶת הַמִּסְעָדָה (ee-TAHR-noo et hah-mees-ah-DAH) - We located the restaurant.

לאתר is a פיעל (piel) usage of the root א.ת.ר (a.t.r).


Do you wish you could speak Hebrew?

If so, we can help you לְהַגְשִׁים (le-hahg-SHEEM) - realize - your dream. 

Check out our courses, offered both online and in person, in Jerusalem and Raanana.






Dec 16, 2010

how to "make a dream come true" in Hebrew...


The root of this one comes from גֶּשֶׁם (GEH-shem), the Hebrew word for rain.

To make it rain - or, to make something materialize is לְהַגְשִׁים (le-hahg-SHEEM). For example, הַחֲלוּצִים הִגְשִׁימוּ אֶת חֲלוֹמָם (hah-khah-loo-TSEEM heeg-SHEE-moo et khah-loh-MAHM) - the pioneers made their dream come true (literally, realized their dream).

This is the הפעיל (heef-EEL) usage of the root. To say dreams are coming true, you'd use the התפעל form, saying, חֲלוֹמוֹת מִתְגַּשְּׁמִים (khah-loh-MOHT meet-gahsh-MEEM).





Do you wish you could speak Hebrew?

If so, we can help you להגשים your dream. 

Check out our courses, offered both online and in person, in Jerusalem and Raanana.



Dec 15, 2010

how to say "to volunteer" in Hebrew...


Perhaps you know Israeli men or boys with the name נָדָב (nah-DAHV). One of the star instructors on the Ulpan La-Inyan staff bears that name. The root נ.ד.ב (n.d.b) is the concept of giving and contributing.

To volunteer oneself, as in cleaning up a beach or spending quality time with underprivileged children, is לְהִתְנַדֵּב (le-heet-nah-DEV). This is the התפעל (heet-pah-EL) usage of the root נ.ד.ב. You can find out more about the התפעל, Hebrew's reflexive form, and how to use it by visiting our page about it on ulpan.com.

But to volunteer something, such as a piece of information, is לְנַדֵּב (le-nah-DEV). For example, הִיא תְּנַדֵּב אֶת הַמֵּידַע (hee te-nah-DEV et hah-may-DAH) - She will volunteer the information. This is the פִּעֵל (pee-EL) usage of נ.ד.ב. You can find out about פיעל here.


Learn Hebrew with us... in Jerusalem, Raanana... or Online!



Due to popular demand, we're launching our online classes again.

So this January, you can be learning Hebrew with us in Jerusalem at AACI, Raanana at Telfed... or anywhere in the world over the Internet.

Registration deadline is Sunday, December 26.

We hope to see you in class!

Ami and the team



Dec 14, 2010

how to say "illegal" in Hebrew...


Last night 150 refugees were deported back to Sudan from Israel.

The phrase for illegal in Hebrew is בִּלְתִּי חֻקִּי (beel-TEE khoo-KEE). The word בלתי functions in Hebrew in a similar way to how the prefixes in- and un- function in English - such as in impossible - בלתי אֶפְשָׁרִי (beel-TEE ef-shah-REE) - and בלתי נִשְׁכַּח (beel-TEE neesh-KAHKH).

You can hear the phrase בלתי נשכח in Ehud Banai's song, הַיּוֹם (hah-YOHM) - Today.

You can also hear songs like his on my radio show - tomorrow at noon Israel time.






Dec 13, 2010

how to say "distance learning" in Hebrew...

לְמִידָה מֵרָחוֹק

Distance learning has become quite an industry. In Hebrew, it's לְמִידָה מֵרָחוֹק (le-mee-DAH me-rah-KHOHK). Literally, that's learning from afar. We use למידה as opposed to לִמּוּד (lee-MOOD), which means teaching.

We at Ulpan La-Inyan are offering our renowned classes to distance learners. If you'd like to take one of our courses, fill out our poll to let us know which you'd like to see offered.




Dec 12, 2010

how to say "a storm" in Hebrew...

סְעָרָה

If you're living on the east coast of the United States, or perhaps in Norway or London or Brazil... you know quite well what a storm is.

In Israel we almost forgot this year - that is, until Friday when it started pouring in Tel Aviv.

The Hebrew word for storm is סְעָרָה (se-ah-RAH). This noun comes from the verbal root, ס.ע.ר (s.a.r), based upon which one might describe weather as stormy - מֶזֶג אָוִיר סוֹעֵר (MEH-zeg ah-VEER soh-EHR). Likewise, some Israeli parents name their boys סַעַר (SAH-ahr), implying a highly energetic, masculine quality.


Ulpan La-Inyan Online Classes

We're back offering our friendly, state-of-the-art courses online this upcoming session - so if you don't live close to Jerusalem or Raanana, you've got another option.

Help us determine which courses to offer online by answering this little poll.




Dec 9, 2010

how to say "to smuggle" in Hebrew...


I'm reading a book written by a cousin of my grandmother's, who was among those in Budapest that helped rescue Jews during the Holocaust. One of the missions he participated in was smuggling Jews across the Romanian border to safety, on their way to אֶרֶץ יִשְׂרָאֵל (EH-rets yees-rah-EL) - the Land of Israel.

To smuggle is לְהַבְרִיח (le-hahv-REE-ahkh). The word falls into the הִפְעִיל (heef-EEL) verb form. The act of smuggling is הַבְרָחָה (hahv-rah-KHAH)

שבת שלום, וסוף שבוע נעים! - Shabbat Shalom, and have a great weekend!




how to say "exciting" or "stirring emotion" in Hebrew...


To get excited in Hebrew is לְהִתְרַגֵּש (le-heet-rah-GESH). It comes from the root ר.ג.ש (r.g.sh), which means, in Modern Hebrew, emotion. The word להתרגש falls into the התפעל (heet-pah-EHL) verb pattern.

To say that something is exciting or stirring of emotion, you'd use the word מְרַגֵּש (me-rah-GESH). For example, 
a couple of the songs I played on Wednesday on my Israeli-music hour at RustyMike Radio were quite מְרַגְּשִׁים (me-rah-ge-SHEEM), to me. I trust they'll be מרגשים for you as well: The Journey to the Land of Israel and Restrain Your Voice from Crying.

מרגש is an adjective that comes from the פִּעֵל (pee-EHL) verb pattern.






Dec 8, 2010

how to say "to light up," "to illuminate" in Hebrew...


If you know some Hebrew, you more than likely know the word for light - אוֹר (ohr) - especially if you've been following Ktzat Ivrit for the last couple of weeks.

Using the three-letter word אור as a verbal root, א.ו.ר (a.w.r), the word for to light up or to illuminate is created: לְהָאִיר (le-hah-EER). This beautiful word has been used in Hebrew prayer and in Jewish names since Mishnaic times, even in the Bible itself, in the conjugation מֵאִיר (meh-EER, but more commonly pronounced MEH-eer) - illuminating or one who illuminates. The name is used in the feminine as well - מְאִירָה (meh-ee-RAH, but more commonly pronounced meh-EE-rah).

To give an example... נֵרוֹת חֲנֻכָּה מְאִירִים אֶת הַבָּיִת וְאֶת הָעוֹלָם (neh-ROHT khah-noo-KAH meh-ee-REEM et hah-BAH-yeet ve-ET hah-oh-LAHM) - Hanukkah candles light up the home and the world.